1981 Springbok Tour Cross on display at Te Papa

 

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In 2010 we wrote about the simple wooden cross carried by St John’s College students during the 1981 Springbok Tour protests that was rediscovered here at the College amongst some discarded timber. Students from the College traveled from Auckland to the test match between the All Blacks and South Africa at Rugby Park in Hamilton on the 25th of July, 1981.

The cross was loaned to Te Papa by request and this loan agreement has just been renewed. The cross is on display in the ‘Slice of Heaven’ exhibition on New Zealand’s social history in the Twentieth Century, under the section titled ‘Diversity and Civil Rights’.

In our collections we also hold various archives that relate to the Springbok Tour:

  • Sir Paul Reeves  provincial papers. [ANG 95/1/33]
  • Te Pihopatanga o Aotearoa records. Bishop’s files – Whakahuihui Vercoe [ANG 141/1/124]
  • Anglican Communications Office. Records of the Director, Peter W. Davis [ANG 161/2/8]
  • St John’s College. Dean’s Office records. Papers of Raymond Pelly, Warden, 1977-1985 [SJC 12/2/6]

The protest by the College was controversial and a statement was made during the President’s Address at the 1982 General Synod. It was printed in the official proceedings and is available at Church Papers Online here:

http://kinderlibrary.outofprint.co.nz/issues/read/52#idx18

 

Remembering the ANZACs from St John’s College: Neale Fitzgerald Eager

To mark the 100th anniversary of the ANZAC landing at Gallipoli an exhibition was held at the John Kinder Theological Library displaying books and archives, as well as biographies of the St John’s College students who served and were killed during World War One.  

These biographies will be posted on this blog over the next week including some significant discoveries we have made while researching these students.

Neale Fitzgerald Eager

St John’s College class photograph 1913. JKTL Archives [SJC 28-4-1]

Born: 6th November 1887.
Died: 1920 in Suez, Egypt. Died of exposure, aged 32.
Buried: Unknown.

Originally, very little was known about Neale (spelt ‘Neil’ on the memorial in the college chapel) Fitzgerald Eager, even being noted as ‘missing’ by the St. John’s College Trust Board. We know he was enrolled as a student here at St John’s College between 1911 and 1913 and that he embarked on the troop ship Star of India on October 16th, 1916.

However, recently digitised service records shows that he actually survived the war. The occupation listed on his form was ‘Divinity Student’ and was then changed to ‘Chemist’. He was discharged from the New Zealand Expeditionary Force and commissioned into the Royal Flying Corps in 1917. He died of exposure while stationed in Suez, Egypt in 1920.

Neale Fitzgerald Eager’s digitised World War One military record.

Remembering the ANZACs from St John’s College: Paul Graham Clark

To mark the 100th anniversary of ANZACs landing at Gallipoli there is currently an exhibition at the John Kinder Theological Library displaying appropriate books and archives, as well as biographies of the St John’s College students who served and were killed during World War One.  

These biographies will be posted on this blog over the next week including some significant discoveries we have made while researching these students.

Paul Graham Clark

Auckland War Memorial Museum

Auckland War Memorial Museum

Born:      9th February 1897 in Leicester, England.

Died:      26th August 1918 in Bapaume, France. Killed in action, aged 21.

Buried:   Archiet-le-Grand Communal Cemetery Extension, Pas-de-Calais, France.

Paul Graham Clark was an Auckland University College studying medicine who was also enrolled at St John’s in 1915.  He applied and was accepted for a Maria Blackett Scholarship the same year when he had to take leave of absence to enlist in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. He was initially rejected as underage and wasn’t accepted into the force until 1918. He attained the rank of Second Lieutenant.

The archives at the John Kinder Theological Library hold correspondence from Clark to the St John’s College Trust Board asking for leave from the college and whether they can hold his scholarship for him until he returns from the war. He was killed while fighting in Bapaume, France.

Remembering the ANZACs from St John’s College: James Dalton Dinneen

To mark the 100th anniversary of the ANZAC landing at Gallipoli an exhibition was held at the John Kinder Theological Library displaying books and archives, as well as biographies of the St John’s College students who served and were killed during World War One.  

These biographies will be posted on this blog over the next week including some significant discoveries we have made while researching these students.

James Dalton Dinneen

james dalteen dineen

Born:      16th July 1883 in Cambridge, Waikato.
Died:      1st October 1916. Died of wounds, aged 32.
Buried:   Heilly Station, Mericourt-l’Abbe, Somme.

James Dalton Dinneen was enrolled as a student at St. John’s College between 1902 and 1904 and gained a B.A. at Auckland University College before working as a teacher at Auckland Grammar School.  He left New Zealand in 1915 to volunteer for the military arm of the Royal Flying Corps where he qualified as a pilot and was promoted to Lieutenant. His poor eyesight caused him to be transferred to the Auckland Battalion of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force where he was promoted to the rank of Captain.

Captain Dinneen was wounded on the 27th of September 1916 several times leading a charge during the Battle of the Somme where over a million men lost their lives. His bravery was mentioned in dispatch and his exploits were recorded in his obituary in the Auckland Grammar School Chronicle. Wounded by machine gun fire and a phosphorous artillery shell, he lay in a shell crater for 30 hours before being treated at an aid station where he died at midnight on the 30th of September.

Remembering the ANZACs from St John’s College: Edward Oliver Ruddock

To mark the 100th anniversary of the ANZAC landing at Gallipoli an exhibition was held at the John Kinder Theological Library displaying books and archives, as well as biographies of the St John’s College students who served and were killed during World War One.  

These biographies will be posted on this blog over the next week including some significant discoveries we have made while researching these students.

Edward Oliver Ruddock

Edward Oliver Ruddock photo Auckland Weekly News 1915

Born:      Unknown.

Died:      11th May 1915 in Egypt. Died of disease, aged 23.

Buried:   Alexandria (Chatby) Military and War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

Edward Oliver Ruddock was the son of Archdeacon David Ruddock of Hawke’s Bay. He studied at St John’s College between 1912 and 1913 and also attended Auckland University. He enlisted as a Field Engineer where he attained the rank of Sapper. He died of disease (appendicitis) while stationed in Egypt in 1915.

Remembering the ANZACs from St John’s College: Eric Hardwick Tayler

To mark the 100th anniversary of the ANZAC landing at Gallipoli an exhibition was held at the John Kinder Theological Library displaying books and archives, as well as biographies of the St John’s College students who served and were killed during World War One.  

These biographies will be posted on this blog over the next week including some significant discoveries we have made while researching these students.

Eric Hardwick Tayler

St John's College Class Photograph 1913 [SJC 28/4/1]

St John’s College Class Photograph 1913 [SJC 28/4/1]

Born: Unknown date in Auckland, New Zealand.
Died: 9th Febuary 1915 Hazebrouck, France. Died of sickness, aged 22.
Buried: Hazebrouck Communal Cemetery, Nord, France.

Eric Hardwick Tayler was born in Auckland and attended Auckland Grammar School from 1907. He was enrolled as a student at St. John’s College between 1910 and 1913, after which he was enrolled at Auckland University College. During this time he had achieved the rank of 2nd Lieutenant in the Territorial Force, 3rd  (Auckland) Regiment.  Shortly before the outbreak of the War, Tayler applied for and was commissioned into the York and Lancaster Regiment in the British Imperial Army who were stationed in India at the time. After the War broke out he was sent to the front line in France. He was there a total of two short weeks in 1915 before he succumbed to pneumonia at an army base hospital.

Wanganui Chronicle 18th February 1915

Wanganui Chronicle 18th February 1915

Remembering the ANZACs from St John’s College: Evelyn Jack Rose

To mark the 100th anniversary of the ANZAC landing at Gallipoli an exhibition was held at the John Kinder Theological Library displaying books and archives, as well as biographies of the St John’s College students who served and were killed during World War One.  

These biographies will be posted on this blog over the next week including some significant discoveries we have made while researching these students.

Evelyn Jack Rose

Weekly News. Auckland War Memorial Museum.

Weekly News. Auckland War Memorial Museum.

Born: Unknown.
Died: 4th October 1917 in Ypres, Belgium. Killed in action, aged 23.
Buried: Tyne Cot Memorial Cemetery, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Evelyn Jack Rose was a student King’s College before enrolling at St John’s College where he studied between 1913 and 1915. He was enrolled at Auckland University College. Enlisting into the war in 1916, he rose to the rank of Second Lieutenant before being killed in Ypres, Belgium. At the time was stationed with the Auckland Infantry Regiment, 1st Battalion, 6th Regiment.

St John’s College Class Photograph 1915 [SJC 28/4/3]

St John’s College Class Photograph 1915 [SJC 28/4/3]

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